Tag: karen foster

Healthy 90 Year-Olds Have The Same Gut Bacteria As 30 Year-Olds

By Karen Foster In one of the largest microbiota studies conducted in humans, scientists have shown a potential link between healthy aging and a healthy gut — finding that the overall microbiome composition of healthy elderly people was similar to that of people decades younger, and that the gut microbiota differed little between individuals from…

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Why Playing An Instrument Protects Your Brain

By Karen Foster A recent study conducted at Baycrest Health Sciences has uncovered a crucial piece into why playing a musical instrument can help older adults retain their listening skills and ward off age-related cognitive declines. This finding could lead to the development of brain rehabilitation interventions through musical training. 400 published scientific papers have…

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‘Use By’ Food Dates Are Responsible For Billions In Food Waste

By Karen Foster Norbert Wilson who joined the Friedman School as a professor of food policy, has been investigating food waste, building on his past research on food choice, domestic hunger, food banking and the international trade of food products. What motivates people to spend good money on food they don’t intend to eat? According…

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80-Year Study Shows Happiness Is The Driving Force In Our Health

By Karen Foster How people describe both positive and negative events in their lives influences their perception of their own life. When scientists began tracking the health of 268 Harvard sophomores in 1938 during the Great Depression, they hoped the longitudinal study would reveal clues to leading healthy and happy lives. They got more than…

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Why Does This South American Population Have The Healthiest Arteries In The World?

By Karen Foster The Tsimane people — a forager-horticulturalist population of the Bolivian Amazon — have the lowest reported levels of vascular aging for any population in the world, with coronary atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) being five times less common than in the U.S. An 80-year-old Tsimane has the same vascular age as an…

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Nature Comes To The Rescue Again – Peppertree Disarms Most Dangerous Bacteria

By Karen Foster Superbugs are without a doubt a major threat affecting all health care systems. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection is caused by a type of staph bacteria that’s become resistant to many of the antibiotics used to treat ordinary staph infections. Despite attempts by new antibiotics to neutralize the effects of MRSA, none…

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