First Clinical Trial to Test the Aluminium/Alzheimer’s Disease Hypothesis

By Natural Blaze

Is Aluminium Involved in Alzheimer’s Disease and Can Silicon-Rich Mineral Waters Protect Against Aluminium’s Involvement in the Disease?

Could Silicon-Rich Mineral Waters be the First and the Only Effective Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease?

We have all heard of Alzheimer’s disease. Many of us know someone who has been affected by this devastating disease.

The clinical facts associated with Alzheimer’s disease are stark.

  • There is no cure for Alzheimer’s disease.
  • We do not know the cause of Alzheimer’s disease.
  • There are no effective treatments for Alzheimer’s disease.

While 50 years of research has revealed much about Alzheimer’s disease it has not resulted in significant benefits to anyone unfortunate enough to be diagnosed with the disease. Why?

During these 50 years one factor, human exposure to aluminium, has been consistently linked to Alzheimer’s disease.

In a recent invited paper, the world’s leading authority on human exposure to aluminium, concluded (after considering this for 30 years) that under certain conditions


‘it was inevitable that aluminium played a contributory role in Alzheimer’s disease’ (http://journal.frontiersin.org/article/10.3389/fneur.2014.00212/abstract).

Again, during the past 50 years there have been myriad clinical trials targeting Alzheimer’s disease. None of these have shown any real efficacy or benefit, for example trials have shown unequivocally that each of the current main treatments for Alzheimer’s disease have no significant benefit. These drugs have been prescribed to individuals with Alzheimer’s disease for over 40 years now and the only immediate beneficiary of such has been the pharmaceutical industry.

There has not been a single significant clinical trial to test the role of aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease during this time. Why?

Why are organisations such as the Alzheimer’s disease charities, government funding bodies and the pharmaceutical industry so quick to discount a role for aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease when such a role has not actually been tested in a clinical trial?

Why is it impossible to obtain funding from any of these organisations to test this hypothesis?

The public are almost certainly not aware of this situation. The normal assumption would be that where hard science has demonstrated a link for 50 years that the link would have been tested during this time. For example, the many individuals who give generously to the Alzheimer’s disease charities would expect that these organisations would support and even fund a clinical trial to establish any role for aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease. They have never done so.

Researchers at Keele University lead by Professor Christopher Exley have pioneered research into the natural history of aluminium, and most recently human exposure to aluminium, for over 30 years. They now believe that the weight of evidence which implicates aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease is so unequivocal that this must be tested in a large scale clinical trial.

They know from hard experience that this trial will not be funded by Alzheimer’s disease charities, government funding agencies or the pharmaceutical industry. We can all probably guess why not!

However, while these organisations may not want to know if aluminium plays a contributory role in Alzheimer’s disease the people of the world may think differently.

This is why we are asking for the public’s help to support and fund a clinical trial which will establish once and for all if human exposure to aluminium is a contributory factor in Alzheimer’s disease.

Full details of the proposed clinical trial, the funding required to carry it out and how the public can support the trial by making a donation are all available through the following website; www.futsci.com or

https://www.futsci.com/project/the-aluminium-alzheimer-s-disease-hypothesis-what-is-the-role-of-aluminium-in-alzheimers-disease

Finally, on a positive note, if this trial goes ahead and it implicates aluminium in Alzheimer’s disease this will mean that, for the very first time, there will be an effective, non-invasive, inexpensive and non-drug-based therapy against the ravages of Alzheimer’s disease.

This is a truly exciting possibility for the future treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

Donations Open at 09:00 BST (GMT+1h) on the 14th of July 2015

Further details about this appeal and the proposed trial can be obtained by contacting Professor Chris Exley (c.exley@keele.ac.uk)

Also please see:

alzheimers-disease
Thank you for sharing. Follow us for the latest updates.

Send this to friend