Russian Company 3D Printed Home in Just 24 Hours for $10,000

apis-cor-3d-printed-home

By Heather Callaghan, Editor

3D-printing is doing everything now: from the best ever casts for broken limbs, gardens, living body parts(!) to printing any color of cosmetics on demand. Still, it’s perception-shattering that a company actually built an entire, livable house in just 24 hours.

Russian 3D-printing company Apis Cor built the house in just 24 hours at an expense of about $10,000. The 400-sq-ft home was created using a mobile printer on-site. (Source)

All main parts of the house were printed entirely with a concrete mix: the walls, “building envelope” and partitions. It has a kitchen, bathroom, living room and hallway. Later, fixtures and furnishings were added with colorful paint job to top it off.

apis cor inside

(c) Apis Cor image

The total cost to construct was actually $10,134. The company boasts that the home will last 175 years, banishing any images of the Money Pit from people’s minds.

Apis Cor’s founder Nikita Chen-yun-tai said,

We want to change public views that construction can’t be fast, eco-friendly, efficient and reliable at the same time.

Our goal is to become the biggest international construction company to solve problems of accommodation around the globe.

Apparently, 3D-printed houses are constructed off-site and then only assembled on the destination site like some giant IKEA project. But Apis Cor claims to be first in 3D printing entire buildings right on the target site. Last year, a Chinese company 3D printed a more conventional home on-site. It took 45 days, but was guaranteed to be earthquake proof.

apis core

(c) Apis Cor image

Must-see video!

 

apis cor machine

(c) Apis Cor image

apis cor info

(c) Apis Cor image

While some may wonder what ripples this technology will send through the housing and construction markets, one thing’s for sure: debt-ridden millennials everywhere are sighing with relief that they may be able to buy that family house in this lifetime after all!

What say you? Do you see any downsides to living in this type of home and would live in one with your family?

Sound off below and don’t forget to share!

Top image: (c) Apis Cor


favorite-velva-small

Heather Callaghan is an independent researcher, writer, speaker and food freedom activist. She is the Editor and co-founder of NaturalBlaze as well as a certified Self-Referencing IITM Practitioner. 

Get a nifty FREE eBook – Like atFacebook, Twitter and Instagram.

 

apis 2_0

Want to republish this article? Feel free, we encourage republishing of our content. Our only requirement is that you include this code below at the end of the post.

Thank you for sharing. Follow us for the latest updates.

Send this to a friend